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Tag:Tim Curley
Posted on: January 14, 2012 4:48 pm
Edited on: January 14, 2012 5:50 pm
 

Paterno gives first interview on Sandusky scandal



Posted by Chip Patterson


Joe Paterno has begun to tell his side of the story. Sally Jenkins, of The Washington Post, did an exclusive interview with Paterno - his first official comments regarding the fallout at Penn State since his firing on Nov. 9. The story will be published in Sunday's edition of the paper, and was made available online on Saturday.

In the story Paterno gives his account of the events surrounding the alleged rape of a young boy by Jerry Sandusky in the Penn State facilities in 2002. The details of what Mike McQueary told the Penn State head coach, and the steps that were or weren't taken by Penn State officials.

From the piece in Sunday's Washington Post:

Paterno contends that ignorance was the context with which he heard McQueary’s disturbing story in 2002. McQueary, sitting at Paterno’s kitchen table, told him that he had been at the football building late the evening before when he heard noises coming from the shower. “He was very upset and I said why, and he was very reluctant to get into it,” Paterno said. “He told me what he saw, and I said, what? He said it, well, looked like inappropriate, or fondling, I’m not quite sure exactly how he put it. I said you did what you had to do. It’s my job now to figure out what we want to do. So I sat around. It was a Saturday. Waited till Sunday because I wanted to make sure I knew what I was doing. And then I called my superiors and I said, ‘Hey, we got a problem, I think. Would you guys look into it?’ Cause I didn’t know, you know. We never had, until that point, 58 years I think, I had never had to deal with something like that. And I didn’t feel adequate.”

At that point, Paterno set up a meeting for McQueary and Curley, the athletic director, and Schultz, who oversaw university police. McQueary has testified that he gave both men a far more graphic description of what he witnessed, which he believed to be Sandusky sodomizing a boy of about 10, who had his hands against the shower wall. At the preliminary hearing for Curley and Schultz on Dec. 16, McQueary said he had been reluctant to go into similar “great detail about sexual acts” with Paterno, out of respect for the coach, who was 78 at the time.

Schultz and Curley have maintained that McQueary failed to impart the seriousness of what he saw to them as well. They never told police about the allegation, instead informing Sandusky he could no longer bring children to university facilities. Prosecutors say Sandusky continued to abuse boys for six more years.

Paterno has said, “In hindsight, I wish I had done more.”

Most of the story lines up with Paterno's grand jury testimony, but there was some interesting insight into Jerry Sandusky's exit. Paterno explains in the interview that he was growing frustrated with Sandusky's involvement with Second Mile, the charity he used to help identify potential victims.

“He came to see me and we talked a little about his career,” Paterno said in the story. “I said, you know, Jerry, you want to be head coach, you can’t do as much as you’re doing with the other operation. I said this job takes so much detail, and for you to think you can go off and get involved in fundraising and a lot of things like that. . . . I said you can’t do both, that’s basically what I told him.”

The interview with Sally Jenkins was conducted on Jan. 12-13, you can read the full story here.

Follow Jim Rodenbush's Nittany Lions RapidReports for more on developments from State College, Pa.

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Posted on: January 12, 2012 12:30 pm
Edited on: January 12, 2012 3:19 pm
 

Report: Jerry Sandusky saw win 409 for Paterno

Posted by Tom Fornelli

According to a Patriot-News report, a week before former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky's arrest following a grand jury investigation into his alleged sexual assault of young boys, he watched Penn State beat Illinois for Joe Paterno's 409th career victory from the president's box at Beaver Stadium. A source told the Patriot-News said that Sandusky was seen in the box during the game and then he was later seen in the Nittany Lion Club.

Former Penn State linebacker Brandon Short also said on Wednesday that he was told by two independent sources that Sandusky had been in the president's box for the game that day as well.

Penn State president Rodney Erickson told national radio host Michael Smerconish that the report was "absolutely false," according to Smerconish, but one Penn State alum reported being in the Nittanly Lion Club with Sandusky for the Purdue game two weeks prior, and said he was under the impression that Sandusky "was always there."

Penn State spokesman Bill Mahon told the paper that a search through the guest list of every game of the last three seasons shows that Sandusky had never been invited to the box. However the report goes on to say that then athletic director Tim Curley -- who resigned following the grand jury indictment -- didn't want to give Sandusky tickets to the game but changed his mind at the insistence of Sandusky's wife, Dottie.

Penn State officials were aware of the investigation into Sandusky long before Penn State's game against Illinois that day.

Photo courtesy of the Patriot-News

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Posted on: December 31, 2011 11:09 am
 

Teen accuses Sandusky of 2004 on-campus assault

Posted by Chip Patterson

Additional allegations of sexual assault have been made against former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. The most recent reported incidents occurring inside the Penn State football offices in 2004 - two years after Sandusky was banned from bringing children into the building.

FoxNews.com spoke the attorney of the now-19-year old accuser, who was a 12-year old summer camper in a program run by Second Mile - Sandusky's charity aid underprivileged youth - at the time of the incident. The accuser has reportedly filed a civil suit against Sandusky, Second Mile, and Penn State.
The teen’s lawyer, Charles Schmidt, told FoxNews.com in an interview on Thursday that Sandusky lured the boy into an office seven years ago, plied him with alcohol and raped him. He said Sandusky then gave the boy Penn State football championship memorabilia, walked him outside and handed him off to a Second Mile counselor.

Schmidt said Sandusky gave the boy a football championship commemorative bottle and a hockey puck, and that both items have recently been turned over to police.

The office where the alleged rape occurred is thought to have been Sandusky’s office in Penn State’s Lasch football building, Schmidt said. He said he thought that Second Mile’s programs were run out of that building.
FoxNews.com reports that the Attorney General's office is investigating the allegations, though there was no official comment from the spokesperson. That statute of limitations for criminal charges in cases like this is 12 years after the accuser's 18th birthday.

Former Penn State athletic director Tim Curley told a grand jury that he banned Sandusky from bringing Second Mile children into the football building in 2002, after Mike McQueary said he saw the former defensive coordinator raping a boy in the showers. Joe Amendola, Sandusky's attorney, claims his client was not banned from using Penn State facilities until November 2011 - after the criminal charges were filed.

While more continues to unravel regarding this sad case in State College, interim head coach Tom Bradley is preparing his team for the TicketCity Bowl on Jan. 2. The Nittany Lions are also searching for a full-time replacement for Joe Paterno.

For on-field Penn State news, get the latest updates at the TicketCity Bowl Pregame 

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Posted on: November 22, 2011 12:57 pm
Edited on: November 22, 2011 12:58 pm
 

JoePa fought school over player discipline

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It's no secret that while he was the head coach at Penn State, Joe Paterno may have been the most powerful man on campus in State College, and according to a report in the Wall Street Journal, Paterno wielded that power whenever possible when it came to the discipline of his players. The Wall Street Journal acquired emails from and talked to former Penn State University standards and conduct officer Vicky Triponey who says that Paterno fought her every step of the way, and wanted to hold football players to a different standard than other students.
The confrontations came to a head in 2007, according to one former school official, when six football players were charged by police for forcing their way into a campus apartment that April and beating up several students, one of them severely. That September, following a tense meeting with Mr. Paterno over the case, she resigned her post, saying at the time she left because of "philosophical differences."

In a statement Monday, Dr. Triponey said: "There were numerous meetings and discussions about specific and pending student discipline cases that involved football players," which she said included "demands" to adjust the judicial process for football players. The end result, she said, was that football players were treated "more favorably than other students accused of violating the community standards as defined by the student code of conduct."
The story also tells of other incidents that took place during Triponey's tenure at Penn State, including a meeting between Paterno and Triponey in 2005 that also involved President Graham Spanier, athletic director Tim Curley and assistant athletic director Fran Ganter. At this meeting Paterno was very vocal in his critique of Triponey and expressed how he didn't like her meddling in the football team's business, which Paterno felt was his territory.

Things came to a head in September of 2005 following the school's suspension of linebacker Dan Connor who had been accused of making harrassing phone calls to a retired assistant coach. Despite the suspension, Paterno ordered Connor to suit up for practice and Connor says he could only recall being suspended for games, not practices.

This resulted in Graham Spanier coming to Triponey's house to inform her that Paterno had given him an ultimatum. The school was to either fire Triponey or he would cease his efforts to fund-raise for the school. Connor's suspension was then reduced to 10 days.

Then came the 2007 incident with the Penn State players involved in that fight at a campus apartment. It was another incident in which Paterno and Triponey had differing views on how things should be handled, with Paterno saying that his players couldn't be expected to cooperate with the school's disciplinary process because it would mean that they'd have to testify against each other, and that would make it hard to play football together.

The majority of charges against the players were eventually dropped, with two players pleading guilty to misdemeanors. There were also four players suspended for a summer semester, but none ever had to miss any games.

Shortly after Triponey resigned and was replaced by Bob Secor, and the school instituted new rules that gave the school limited ability to end a student's participation in activities such as football.
Posted on: November 18, 2011 5:56 pm
 

Sandusky's Second Mile charity to fold

Posted by Adam Jacobi

In the wake of a massive investigation against former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky for sexual assault on several young boys, the executives of The Second Mile -- the charity Sandusky formed in 1977 to work with underprivileged boys, and the avenue through which prosecutors say Sandusky met and groomed each of his eight alleged victims -- announced on Friday that they plan to fold the charity. According to the New York Times, the charity hopes to incorporate some of its programs into other outside organizations.

“We’re working hard to figure out how the programs can survive this event,” new chief executive David Woodle said in an interview with the Times. “We aren’t protective of this organization that it survives at all costs.”

Earlier this week, the charity announced that longtime chief executive Jack Raykovitz was resigning from his role effective immediately in the wake of the scandal. Woodle had been the the vice chair of operations for the charity until Raykovitz resigned on Sunday. Raykovitz has not been charged by Pennsylvania prosecutors of any criminal behavior, nor have they mentioned him as a target of the ongoing investigation, but he has been roundly criticized after reports emerged that he was informed of Sandusky's alleged behavior by Penn State AD Tim Curley in 2002.

Here's more from the Times' report:

On Sunday, the charity’s board of directors authorized the hiring of Lynne M. Abraham and the law firm Archer & Greiner to conduct an independent investigation into Second Mile. The investigation will seek to discover the extent of contact Sandusky had with children who went through the program, when the program learned about various allegations against Sandusky, and how it handled them.

According to testimony given before a grand jury in Harrisburg, Pa., Athletic Director Tim Curley informed the charity’s chief executive in 2002 that Sandusky had been directed not to bring youngsters onto the Penn State campus after a graduate assistant reported that Sandusky had engaged in inappropriate conduct with a boy in a shower. (The graduate assistant, Mike McQueary, testified that he was far more specific and told administrators that he saw Sandusky raping the youth.)

Woodle declined to answer questions about what, if anything, was done after that. Nor would he say if the charity took steps to limit or monitor Sandusky’s interactions with Second Mile youth after Sandusky himself informed the Second Mile in 2008 that he was under investigation for a separate incident involving inappropriate behavior. Woodle said that those were matters that fall under the scope of Abraham’s investigation. He said the board would publicly address those issues and others, but not before she finishes her inquiry, which he said he expected to take until the end of the year.

“The board agrees that these are good questions,” he said. 

Posted on: November 13, 2011 12:24 am
 

Sandusky, Schultz draw hefty pensions from PSU

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky and former Penn State treasurer/vice president of business Gary Schultz may both be retired, but they're both drawing substantial amounts of money from the school -- even as both face serious charges from the state of Pennsylvania. 

According to PennLive.com, Sandusky, who faces 40 charges of sexual assault for incidents that date back to his tenure as assistant head coach at Penn State, accepted a lump sum payment of over $148,000 from the State Employees upon retiring from Penn State in 1999. Since then, Sandusky has been deriving monthly pension payments that total $58,898 annually.

As for Schultz, the 39-year employee of Penn State retired in 2009, and had rejoined Penn State on an interim basis in 2011 when he was charged with perjury and failure to report child abuse in the Sandusky investigation. Upon his first retirement retirement, Schultz accepted a lump sum of $421,847, and currently draws a pension of $27,558 per month -- enough for an annual income of over $330,000 in pension.

If Schultz is convicted on his charges, however, he stands to forfeit that pension. Under Act 140 of Pennsylvania state law, there are several types of actions related to public trust that could trigger a forfeiture of pension. There is an entire Section of Act 140 relating specifically to perjury, which is one of the charges Schultz faces. And even if he is innocent of the perjury charge, he may also be subject to forfeiture under Section 5101, which relates to, among other things, obstructing administration of law. 

If Schultz does forfeit his pension, according to the law, he is still entitled to the money he paid in without interest, but that money must first go to legal fees and restitution related to the crime that forced his forfeiture. It was not announced how much Schultz paid in during his time at Penn State, and obviously it's too early to know how much in legal fees Schultz's criminal case will accrue -- or whether his case will end in forfeiture.

It's also worth noting that among the various reasons for forfeiting pension, Sandusky's charges don't appear to be covered as reasons to forfeit pension.

For the record, athletic director Tim Curley -- who also faces charges of perjury and failure to report -- did not participate in the state's pension plan, nor did fired school president Graham Spanier. Fired head coach Joe Paterno did participate, but his information has not yet been released by Penn State. A request is already in to the school for that information from the Patriot-News.

Posted on: November 12, 2011 10:44 pm
Edited on: November 12, 2011 11:17 pm
 

Loophole could limit civil suits against Penn St.

Posted by Adam Jacobi

According to a report on ESPN.com, the way Pennsylvania state law is written, many of the alleged victims in the Jerry Sandusky sexual assault case may not be able to file a lawsuit against Penn State or other defendants -- and their age may be the reason.

According to Pennsylvania state law, plaintiffs over the age of 20 may only file lawsuits in cases of sexual abuse that involved "forcible compulsion," which may exclude some of the lesser charges Sandusky currently faces -- regardless of their ages at the time of the alleged assaults. Seven of the eight alleged victims are now over the age of 20.

Here's more from the report: 

Shanin Specter, a litigator in Philadelphia who has been contacted by the family of one of the alleged victims, said the loophole could eliminate some of the victims as viable plaintiffs.

Specter said his firm will meet with the young man and his mother early next week to begin exploring legal options. He said he was contacted last week by the mother, whose son is one of eight alleged victims listed in the grand jury presentment against Sandusky.

"There's no doubt Joe Paterno will be sued and it will be left up to the discovery process to determine his liability," Specter said. "There are a lot of victims who suffered damages, and I expect that some number of defendants will be obligated to pay a lot of money."

Specter said he expects all of the men cited in the grand jury presentment will face lawsuits for any role they played in not reporting the alleged crimes to authorities. 

It's important to note that at this point, regardless of Specter's certainty on the issue, no civil suits have been filed yet. That's obviously subject to change over the coming weeks and months, but until those theoretical suits do (or don't) get filed, there's no way to address what effect the statute has on any complaints.

It was announced on Friday that Joe Paterno had retained criminal defense lawyer Wick Sollers in this matter, even though Paterno is not facing charges and was described as not being a target of the investigation by Pennsylvania attorney general Linda Kelly

Sandusky faces 40 charges of varying severity related to the sexual assault of minors, up to and including rape, after alleged incidents that occurred from 1995 to 2009.

Posted on: November 11, 2011 2:52 pm
Edited on: November 11, 2011 8:48 pm
 

Virginia denies Penn State contact with London

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE: Official word from the Virginia athletic department is that any stories regarding Mike London's direct or indirect contact with Penn State about a coaching position are "simply not true."  The Cavaliers, trailing only Virginia Tech in the Coastal Division standings, face Duke at home on Saturday.



After nearly half of a century, the Penn State head football coaching position is open. While interim head coach Tom Bradley prepares the current roster for a run at the Big Ten title, the school has already begun looking toward the future. According to a local report, Penn State has already begun targeting potential candidates. One of the first of which being Virginia head coach Mike London.

CBSSports.com's Jim Rodenbush reports that Penn State contacted London before Paterno was officially dismissed by the Board of Trustees. According to the Washington Post, London told Trustees Charman Steve Garban that he was not interested in the job.

While London has no specific ties to the Nittany Lions, he did spend three seasons on the Virginia coaching staff under then-defensive coordinator Al Golden. Golden, former tight end and team captain at Penn State, has been immediately suggested as a candidate for the job, though the Miami head coach insists that he and his family are happy in Coral Gables. London eventually followed Golden as defensive coordinator for two seasons before spending two seasons as the head coach at Richmond.

In only his second year at Virginia, London already has the Cavaliers bowl eligible and in contention for an ACC Coastal Division title. With a focus on in-state recruiting and rebuilding pride in the program, London's strides in Charlottesville deserve the attention he has been receiving. His "no thanks" to Penn State likely has as much (if not more) to do with the success at Virginia than the issues in State College.

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