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Tag:Dan Hawkins
Posted on: May 25, 2011 12:46 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 9:57 am
 

CBSSports.com College Football 100: 100-91

By the Eye on College Football bloggers

To celebrate the 100 days remaining until the first Saturday of the new college football season, this is the CBSSports.com College Football 100: our countdown of the 2011 season's 100 most influential players, coaches, administrators, venues, or any other related
things in college football. It's like that other "most influential" list, but, you know, more important. Also: it's supposed to be fun. Enjoy.

100. THE DOOLEY RULE, new NCAA regulation.
We don’t know when; we don’t know where. But we’re betting that at some point this season, college football’s new Dooley Rule -- which punishes offenses that commit a penalty in the last minute of either half with a 10-second runoff from the game clock -- makes a major impact on the outcome of a game. If it’s the right game, the rule could make a major impact on the outcome of college football’s entire season.

That’s not necessarily likely, of course. Until namesake Derek Dooley’s Tennessee team lost last year’s Music City Bowl when North Carolina stopped the clock with its own penalty, the situation hadn’t yet seemed to occur in a high-profile college football game. (There’s a reason it took until 2011 for the rule to be put into place.) But now that it’s there, we think the odds are good that we’ll see it put into practice this fall … and that the losing coach will be sure to let us know about it. -- JH

99. JARED HASSIN, running back, Army. For the last nine years, Army has fallen short of toppling their Navy counterparts. Could 2011 be the year that the Black Knights finally get over the hump? If they do, it will likely be thanks to the efforts of Hassin. He broke out in a big way his sophomore season, racking up 1,013 yards and 9 touchdowns, helping lead Army to their first postseason appearance since 1996 and first bowl win since 1985.

Hassin was originally enrolled in the Air Force Academy before transferring back to Army (his original commitment) and sitting out 2009. It was an odd recruitment, especially for the son of an Army graduate. But regardless of the process, the lifelong Army football fan is now playing for the team he grew up loving. He is undisputedly one of the most important players on the Black Knights, and fans hope the 6-3, 235-pound back can flash the historic rivalry back to the late 80's and early 90's, when Army took 9 of 11 from the Midshipmen. -- CP

98. GUNNER KIEL, quarterback, Columbus (Ind.) East High School. The nation's top quarterback in the class of 2012 and number two overall prospect according to MaxPreps analyst Tom Lemming, Kiel holds a scholarship offer from just about every program in the country. The 6-foot-4, 210 pound signal-caller is ideal for just about any kind of system and has a good arm, throws the ball accurately and is a natural born leader on the field.

Kiel comes from a long line of quarterbacks - his uncle Blair played at Notre Dame and in the NFL and both of his brothers play the position in college - and the next in line might be the most talented out of all of them. His recruitment, as one would expect from a top prospect, is not being played out in the public as he is trying to keep things close to the vest. Oklahoma, Indiana, Missouri and Alabama are a few of the schools making a strong push for his services but it will be well into the season (or after it) before he ends up making a decision; expect to hear plenty about it as 2011 progresses. -- BF

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97. RYAN TANNEHILL, quarterback, Texas A&M. The Aggies had two different seasons in 2010: one B.T. (Before Tannehill) and one A.T. (After Tannehill). With Jerrod Johnson at quarterback, the Aggies were 3-3 on the season, and 0-3 in Big 12 play. Then Tannehill took over the reins against Kansas on Oct. 23 and Texas A&M didn't look back. The Aggies reeled off six straight wins, including games over Oklahoma, Nebraska and (the coup de gras) Texas. They wouldn't know defeat under Tannehill until the Cotton Bowl, where LSU won 41-24.

Still, Tannehill was a revelation. Not only was he able to run a rather potent Aggies offense, but he did so without the crippling turnovers that became a trademark of Texas A&M under Johnson. This season will be different for Tannehill, however. No longer is he the former tight end-turned-savior, but the quarterback who is supposed to make sure Texas A&M takes the next step--its first league title since 1998, and just their second Big 12 title ever. -- TF

96. GREG MATTISON, defensive coordinator, Michigan. One could certainly make the argument that it was the continuing ineptitude of former defensive coordinator Greg Robinson that cost former head coach Rich Rodriguez his job in Ann Arbor. After all, Robinson's latter year spearheading the Wolverine defense was, by far, the worst in points allowed in Michigan history; the former was the third-worst (and just for good measure, the second-worst season came in Rich-Rod's first season, with one-and-done Scott Shafer as DC). Yes, Michigan has an unusually stingy history of defense, but that's just the thing: Michigan fans have every reason to expect that stingy defense. That's just how it's done at Michigan.

It'll be up to Mattison, then, to keep Brady Hoke's seat cool, and he's got the pedigree to do it. Mattison is entering his 35th year of assistant coaching defense and his 16th as a defensive coordinator, and he's been a part of some very successful defenses (Florida's '06 BCS Championship team, for one). Fans shouldn't expect miracles and shutouts on Day 1 or even in Year 1, but they're going to need to see some sense this year that Michigan's old way of football is coming back. Getting the points per game allowed back under 27.5 for the first time since 2007 would be a good start. -- AJ

95. TYLER BRAY, quarterback, Tennessee. Give the sophomore gunslinger from California this: he doesn't lack for confidence. From the moment he stepped into Tennessee's starting lineup as a true freshman in midseason 2010, Bray carried himself with a swagger that paid big dividends in the Volunteers' season-ending, bowl-salvaging four-game winning streak--a streak in which Bray threw for 12 touchdowns and better than 1,200 yards. Behind four more Bray scoring strikes, the Vols nearly upset UNC in their bowl game (see above), raising expectations for even bigger things in 2011.

But Bray might have taken a little too much self-belief into spring, where he finished an up-and-down camp with a miserable 5-for-30 performance in the Orange-White Game. If he can harness his confidence and continue building on last year's impressive debut, the Vols could be major spoilers in a logjammed SEC East. If not, one of the nation's proudest programs could slip below .500 for the third time in four years. -- JH

94. JON EMBREE, head coach, Colorado. After a disastrous experience with an outsider as head coach in Dan Hawkins, Colorado turned to someone with a strong connection to the program in Embree, a former tight end and assistant coach for the Buffs. He's never been a head coach before but his fiery attitude and pledge to bring back several school traditions have already gotten players and alumni fired up for the upcoming season.

Embree has his work cut out for him though, with Colorado coming off a 5-7 season and transitioning to a new league, the Pac-12. He installed a pro-style offense during the spring and has his staff hitting the recruiting trail hard over the past few months to get word out about the program. The schedule is tough, hosting Oregon and going to both Ohio State and Stanford, but Embree has a senior quarterback in Tyler Hansen and a few solid pieces to build around. Expectations are rising in Boulder and while it might be too much to ask of Embree to turn everything around in his first year, he sure will make things more interesting up in the mountains. -- BF

93. SAVON HUGGINS, running back, Rutgers. Huggins enters his true freshman season with the Scarlet Knights with high expectations from the Rutgers fan base. At their spring game in April, Huggins drew about as much fanfare in his street clothes as the boys in pads. Huggins was one of the few big signing day steals for head coach Greg Schiano, and the Maxpreps No. 1-ranked running back should be an immediate upgrade for the Big East's worst rushing offense in 2010.

Fans are not the only ones anxiously awaiting Huggins' arrival. The coaching staff failed to identify any kind of order for the position in the post-spring depth chart. When Huggins suits up for fall camp, he will have as much of a chance to play as the three current backs on the chart. Hailing from nearby Jersey City, NJ, Huggins is the new face of Rutgers football. If he doesn't pan out into the star Schiano is hoping for, the 2006 Coach of the Year might find himself suddenly on a warmer seat in Piscataway. -- CP

92. QUALCOMM STADIUM, home field, San Diego State. Thanks to years of incompetence from its regular Aztec tenants, the former Jack Murphy Stadium's most prominent ties to college football have been the Holiday Bowl and (more recently) the Poinsettia Bowl. And those aren't insiginificant, particularly considering some of the classics that have been played in the Holiday.

But that should change this year. SDSU is poised for potentially their biggest season in school history, with senior quarterback Ryan Lindley and sophomore running back Ronnie Hillman forming the most dynamic QB-RB combo in the Mountain West. To win the conference the Aztecs will have to go through both TCU and Boise State, but wouldn't you know it--both MWC frontunners must visit Qualcomm this year, the Frogs Oct. 8 and Broncos Nov. 19. With two chances for the Aztecs, don't be surprised if "the Q" plays host to this year's version of Nevada-Boise, the upset that turns the non-AQ BCS chase on its head. -- JH

91. PAUL RHOADS, head coach, Iowa State. When Paul Rhoads took over as head coach at Iowa State in 2009, replacing Gene Chizik -- whatever happened to that guy? -- he was walking into a tough situation. The Cyclones had only won five games in the previous two seasons, but the man who grew up 20 miles outside Ames led the team to seven wins in 2009, including a win over Minnesota in the Insight Bowl. Iowa State took a step back in 2010, but did get a huge win over Texas and narrowly lost to Nebraska in overtime.

In 2011, however, the time for moral victories has passed. While the Cyclones have won 12 games under Rhoads in his first two seasons, only six have come against conference opponents, four of them coming against former Big 12 North teams. Now the Cyclones will no longer have seasons in which they don't have to play Texas and Oklahoma, so winning in the conference won't be easy. Of course, it's not like anybody is expecting Iowa State to compete for the conference title every season, but if Iowa State wants to be better than a program that makes the occasional bowl appearance, Rhoads is going to have to do more than pull off the occasional shocker. -- TF

Check back tomorrow at Eye on College Football for Nos. 90-81 on the countdown, and follow us on Twitter.




Posted on: April 13, 2011 1:15 pm
Edited on: April 13, 2011 1:16 pm
 

Hansen officially Buffs' starting QB

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

After years -- or as it must have seemed like to Buffs fans, millenia -- of injuries, waffling, and general lack of leadership at the quarterback position, the arrival of new head coach Jon Embree (and graduation of annual backup/spot starter Cody Hawkins) seems to have put an end to the question marks. Tyler Hansen is officially your Colorado quarterback starter, and it doesn't sound like there's any wiggle room in Embree's decision:

For Hansen, being named the starter at this point in the year is a first ... This year he will have the entire summer to work with teammates and lead summer throwing sessions with his teammates knowing he will be their leader in the fall.

"Tyler did a great job all spring," Embree said in the news release. "He has command of everything you need to have at quarterback and has also developed into a team leader. This was a goal of his heading into the spring and I'm happy that he was able to attain that goal."

Hansen completed 39 of 53 passes for 531 yards and five touchdowns in the three main spring scrimmages. He did not throw an interception. He also ran four times for 37 yards.

Those are some mighty fine numbers there, and suggest the Buffs coule have a legitimately threatening passing game for the first time since the Gary Barnett era. Of course, since they've all come against the Colorado secondary, they also suggest Embree has some work to do in the secondary.

But given how hamstrung Colorado has been by the quarterback position the past few season, it's hard to imagine any Buffs fans -- or Embree, who knows how badly the seemingly rudderless Dan Hawkins Buffs need a strong, rally-to-the-flag on-field leader like an entrenched senior Hansen -- offering up the first complaint.

(And hey, while we're discussing Colorado and quarterbacks, you should know former Georgia backup quarterback and occasional Bulldog receiver/punt returner Logan Gray has transferred to Boulder and should be eligible immediately, due to the same graduate program loophole that allowed Jeremiah Masoli to startfrom Day 1 at Ole Miss. But don't expect Gray to show up at all on Colorado's quarterbacking depth chart, much less challenge Hansen; he's expected to help fill in the Buffs' depeleted corps of wideouts.)


Posted on: April 1, 2011 5:48 pm
 

Friday Four Links (and a cloud of dust), 4/1

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Every Friday we catch up on four stories you might have missed during the week ... and add a few extra links to help take you into the weekend.


FOUR LINKS ...

1. National champions Auburn might not have enjoyed the HBO expose that aired this week, but they got plenty of love from more official channels, with the Alabama state House honoring Gene Chizik with a resolution and Cam Newton getting similar treatment from the legislature in his home state of Georgia. But for Auburn fans, the biggest honor of the week was the news that NASCAR driver Michael Waltrip will be driving this car at Talladega April 17 to commemorate the Tigers' achievement:



2. Sounds like Florida's going to have a friend in the broadcast booth this year as Jon Gruden attended Will Muschamp's first Gainesville coaching clinic and called the Muschamp-Charlie Weis coaching tandem "the best in college football." Also in attendance despite the rumors that he and Muschamp had not always seen eye-to-eye in Austin: former Texas offensive coordinator Greg Davis.

3. You may have seen this already:



Even if you haven't, you know that there is only one coach who would put up a motivational chart with a "World of the Uninvested" and a "Circle of the Untrustables." Houston Nutt explains the chart and its genesis to the Clarion-Ledger here.

4. Colorado quarterback Tyler Hansen doesn't sound like he's bearing any real grudge towards former head coach Dan Hawkins and his son, fellow (ex-)quarterback Cody Hawkins, but he does say Hawkins the Elder's handling of his son did include "a little nepotism." Which is why the whole situation sounds more than a little awkward.

... AND THE CLOUD

Jimbo Fisher is asking fans for their prayers and thoughts as his son Ethan battles an undisclosed health issue ... Former Texas Tech running back and Lubbock Avalanche-Journal guest columnist Baron Batch has a pretty amazing story to tell ... After $100,000 raises for each, Alabama coordinators Kirby Smart (defensive) and Jim McElwain (offensive) are earning a combined $1.36 milllion ... Speaking of contracts, Mike Locksley has renegotiated his New Mexico deal in a fashion that makes it easier for both parties to part ways ... Two reserve linemen for Michigan State have been knocked out of spring practice (and maybe longer) with injuries ... Marcus Davis, a backup safety at Oregon who'd transferred from Texas, has left the Duck program ... Colorado reported one secondary violation to the NCAA from their recent recruiting cycle, but since it's for feeding the 10-year-old brother of a visiting recruit, we doubt they're too ashamed about it ... Mississippi State has a new announcer for their radio broadcasts, always a big deal anywhere college football's a big deal ... Joe Bauserman is taking the first-team snaps at Ohio State quarterback while Terrelle Pryor recovers ... And here's video of Notre Dame's quarterbacks donning a helmet-cam for practice. Thus the indomitable sprit of the World League of American Football lives on.

Posted on: March 29, 2011 7:13 pm
 

Tedford to take Cal play-calling reins ... again

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When Andy Ludwig bailed on the Cal offensive coordinator's job in January, we wrote that Jeff Tedford had three options when it came to naming a new play-caller: 1. replacement coordinator Jim Michalczik, who hadn't called plays for a team at any level of football in nine season 2. new receivers coach/passing game coordinator Eric Kiesau, who oversaw two dreadful offenses under Dan Hawkins at Colorado 3. Jeff Tedford.

And though Tedford's last season as primary play-caller didn't end well -- in 2007, the Bears finished 3-6 in the Pac-10 as Tedford's offense ranked 50th in FBS scoring -- it's no surprise that with his Cal tenure at a critical juncture following last year's 5-7 disappointment, he's elected to go with the option he trusts most ... himself:
"I did it the first three or four years here, then went back and forth," Tedford said. "You've got to be all in or out, one of the two. There's got to be a role you play. You get to set things up, have a good feel for things."

Tedford has something of an uphill climb; the Bears languished at 90th in FBS total offense in 2010 and must replace longtime starting quarterback Kevin Riley.

But the reason anyone's interested in discussing Cal football in the first place is, of course, Jeff Tedford's offensive acumen, the driving force behind the Bears' rise from the Pac-10 basement to (occasional) title contention. If anyone knows the best way to turn the ship in Berkeley around, it's probably the guy who stopped it from dragging the conference floor in the first place.


Posted on: March 24, 2011 10:52 am
 

Buffaloes may have found stadium sponsor

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Other than perhaps "mediocre," over the past couple of years no adjective has been used more often to describe Colorado's football program than "cash-strapped ." And with a raft of buyouts and new contracts to pay for in the wake of Dan Hawkins' dismissal (and Jon Embree's hiring), not to mention the cost of the switch from the Big 12 to the Pac-12, gridiron money in Boulder is still as scarce as ever.

So maybe it's no surprise the Buffs are exploring one of football's most time-honored strategies for a quick injection of cash: renaming the stadium after someone willing to give them an awful lot of money , as the Boulder Camera reports:
The University of Colorado is discussing a deal for the naming rights to Folsom Field with at least one Colorado-based company, athletic director Mike Bohn confirmed ...

The Camera reported several years ago that the Board of Regents gave initial approval to Bohn to pursue naming rights opportunities for the stadium with the stipulation that any deal retain Folsom Field as part of the name. The regents would have to approve any agreement.

"We recognize the significant partnership and activation opportunity that exists with a stadium naming relationship," Bohn said. "We have been working for the last several years to find a partner to play a role in our continued movement to the Pac-12.

"It would be premature to reveal potential partners or naming efforts at this time."

Premature or not, one potential partner-slash-naming effort has been reveealed all the same, as the following snapshot appeared Tuesday on the Colorado message board AllBuffs.com:

That's an image of a Frontier Airlines jet behind the "Frontier Stadium" banner on the Folsom Field video board there. So we'd say it's a pretty safe bet that the Colorado-based air carrier is a primary candidate for the naming rights; the Camera reported the image was placed on the board to give visiting Frontier executives an idea of how the name might look. (And now, thanks to the leak, everyone knows how it might look.)

If the deal is done, obviously, that'll be great news for a Colorado program that needs the money, and the proposed "Folsom Field at Frontier Stadium" moniker is at least more palatable than simply ditching the Folsom Field name that's graced the venue since 1944 .

That said, it's still just one more way the economics of major college football is making our sport more and more similar to its professional counterpart. Here's to hoping the expected deal in Boulder is the end of a trend rather than the start of one.


Posted on: March 11, 2011 5:54 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: Colorado

Posted by Bryan Fischer

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice. So we here at the Eye on College Football will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers. Today, we look at Colorado, who opens spring camp today.

Spring practice question: How will the Buffs look under new coach Jon Embree?

The short answer is they won't look anything like the team that went 19-39 under Dan Hawkins. The long answer depends on how quickly the team can adapt to a new head coach and a new conference, neither of which should be an easy transition.

Embree, a former Colorado player and assistant, has already started to leave his mark on the program. One of the first things he did after wrapping up his first recruiting class was announce that several traditions would be returning to a school with a rich history full of them.

"There's been a lot of great traditions around here that have been swept under the rug and they're coming back," he said in a rousing speech at Colorado's recruiting luncheon after signing day. "And it starts with Hawaii."

While the first game is a few months away, the goal is clear for a program that was known mostly for failing to live up to the high expectations of Hawkins. There's several on-field adjustments Embree has already started to implement, starting with installing a west coast offense. Offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy will have a few tools to work with, including returning starter Tyler Hansen and transfer Brent Burnett at quarterback. Also returning is senior tailback Rodney Stewart, who is coming off his best season in three years as a starter, and several promising young backups.

The offensive line will also look different this spring but not too much. Stud left tackle Nate Solder departs to the NFL (though maybe not to the Denver Broncos based on this video). Center Mike Iltis will also miss the spring while he recovers from a torn ACL but there will be three other returning starters to help show the new guys how things are done.

Defensively is where Embree faces the most challenges. The Buffs gave up 30 points per game and were 110th in the nation in pass defense despite having possible first round draft pick Jimmy Smith starting at corner. Also gone is senior corner Jalil Brown and two players in the mix to start in the secondary are out for spring ball with injuries with the rest of the players in contention having little or no playing experience. Defensive tackles Curtis Cunningham and Will Pericak will return once again but the trick will be figuring who plays linebacker behind them with the departure of leading tackler Mike Sipili. Luckily the team won't have to learn too much scheme-wise this spring with the return of former secondary coach Greg Brown as defensive coordinator.

"We`re evolving right now," Brown told the Boulder Daily Camera. "There is no way of knowing where the thing is going to end up. Our focus right now is on spring ball and just trying to line up and play it straight and see if we can win some one-on-one battles let alone trying to out-scheme somebody."

Either way you slice though, change is in the thin atmosphere of Boulder. A new conference, a new staff and several new players are going to get their first glimpse of Colorado this spring. 

Most hope the new look is a lot better on the field than before. If anything, it sure is different.

Posted on: February 5, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Pac-12 won't leave Colorado empty-handed in '11

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Colorado finds itself in one of the bigger financial pickles in major college football, needing to pay: a buyout to the Big 12 after having secured their jump to the Pac-12; any and all buyouts for dismissed head coach Dan Hawkins and his former assistant coaches; the salaries of new coach Jon Embree and his assistants under their new contracts and potential signing bonuses. Not only that, but the Buffs will have to do all of that on a budget that was already described as one of BCS football's most stretched.

But the Buffs got some good news this week, as Pac-12 commissioner Larry Scott said that though the Buffs would have to wait a year to get a full share of the conference's television payouts, their first season in their new league home will net the program something (emphasis added):

Scott said the conference and Colorado have reached an agreement under which CU will receive a pro-rated share of any new revenue the league generates outside of its current television agreement, which will expire at the end of the 2011-12 school year.

The conference already has secured new revenue that meets that standard in a $25 million television agreement with Fox for the rights to the first Pac-12 football championship games and other games played throughout the year by Colorado and Utah that don`t fall under the league`s current television deal.

"They will get several million dollars next year from us because we were highly successful in negotiating our championship deal, even though we didn`t guarantee them any money next year," Scott said. "But it won't come anywhere close to what they're forgoing and what the (Big 12) buyout will be."

Scott added -- and clearly, the Buffs brass would agree -- that the Buffs will eventually profit by making the move, since the money shelled out by ESPN for the new Texas network suggests that the market will pay handsomely for the new Pac-12 contract (which will go into effect for the 2012-2013 season once signed). And thanks to the initial agreement with Fox, Colorado can even pick up "several million dollars" while they wait.

Until then, the Buffs are still going to be digging out of a financial hole, one that's going to make an already-difficult transition to the Pac-12 under a new coaching staff even more difficult. But they can take heart that even if their new conference brethren "didn't guarantee them" a cent for 2011, they appear nonetheless committed to helping the Buffs out of that hole as best they can.
Posted on: February 4, 2011 2:18 pm
 

Colorado to play spring game under the lights

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Colorado head coach Jon Embree has big ideas about changing his program. He necessarily has to; the status quo for Colorado has deteriorated to the point that merely doing things Dan Hawkins' way but just better isn't going to bring many fans or high-level recruits into the fold.

Now, while recruiting for 2011 is done and actual football won't start for another seven months, there isn't a whole lot Embree (or any other coach--this isn't an indictment of Embree specifically) can do to excite fans between now and the start of the 2011 season except, well, talk.

One area where he can start making changes that directly affect the fans, however, is the spring game. And on that note, Colorado will be playing its annual spring game at night:

Embree said Saturday afternoons in the spring are often consumed with parents and kids around the state traveling to, and participating in, assorted sporting events such as baseball, lacrosse or track and field meets. He said it makes it hard for them to make it to the spring game, which has usually started around 1 p.m. in recent years.

Embree is particularly mindful of trying to make the game more accessible to area football players and teams who might want to make the trip to Boulder to see the stadium and the program in a game-like situation.

"I thought it would create a nice atmosphere," he said. "I think it gives people more of an opportunity to come up. I know how it was when I was here and we had the spring game. My boys were bummed because they had a baseball game and couldn`t come.

"I think it will help us get some of the in-state kids up here for the game."

Embree's clearly not doing a very good job of disguising his real motivation for the switch: recruiting. Later in the article, he even goes on to mention that he'd like to bring in the Colorado HS football state champions at halftime of the spring game, and if that's not a gigantic NCAA violation, it will be the next time the rules are revisited.

And yet, potential recruits are far from the only people who would enjoy watching a spring game under the lights. Depending on what the school does with tailgating policies for the new night game, students might have an absolute blast with the event (and some'll probably show up drunk no matter what). Moreover, since it's just a spring game, there's really no need to stay until the very end; fans can just come to see as much as they want, then go home whenever, which minimizes traffic problems. 

Plus, night football's just fun. Sure, it'll be chillier than if the game were during the day; Boulder's average highs are in the mid-to-upper 50s during early April (the spring game is April 9), while lows are in the mid-30s. But 35-40 degrees for a football isn't terrible, and it's not as if nobody in Colorado has a coat.

All in all, this should be a neat development. We'll see how the fans respond to such an event.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com