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Blog Entry

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Posted on: April 15, 2011 11:07 am
Edited on: April 15, 2011 11:10 am
 
Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's come too late to save Tennessee's infamous last-second -- or more accurately, post- last-second -- Music City Bowl loss to North Carolina. But in the wake of the Tar Heels saving themselves from watching the clock run out by accidentally committing an offensive penalty, the NCAA has now officially followed the NFL's lead in instituting a 10-second runoff for offensive infractions inside the final minute of either half.

Technically, the runoff isn't mandatory; the defending team has the option of declining both it and the penalty if they happen to be behind.

The new rule was recommended in February by the NCAA's Football Rules Committee and approved by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel, who naturally led their release with the panel's relatively minor change to receivers' ability to block below the waist. The NCAA also offers no recommendations on what to call the new clock regulation, though the "Dooley Rule" has to be the leader in the clubhouse.

Reviewing the other rules changes:
  • Previously, receivers' below-the-waist blocks (i.e. "cut" blocks, though you knew that already) were determined to be legal based in part on how close they were to the line-of-scrimmage or whether they were in motion. Now, unless they start the play within seven yards of the center (essentially, as a tight end), receiver's cut blocks must be made against a player facing them or headed towards the sideline. It sounds confusing, but from the official's perspective, disregarding the previous qualifications in favor of "have you lined up inside the tackle box or as a tight end or not?" has simplified things. We think.
  • The panel gave final approval to two rules changes already decided on last year, the more noteworthy of which is the shift of taunting penalties to live ball fouls, giving the officials the right to revoke a touchdown based on unsportsmanlike conduct while the touchdown is being scored.. No doubt you've read -- and complained -- about this decision plenty already.
  • The other change? Coaches will be allowed monitors in their coaching booths to watch a live broadcast of the game--and, to the point, determine if a replay challenge should be issued or not. As a result, we could see a slight uptick in the effectiveness of challenges in college football this coming season.
Comments

Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:26 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Your entire argument centers around falses premises and assumptions. Then everything else in extrapolated from that point. You keep using the NFL rule and applying it to the college game. The two rules are not the same. Granted the rule will change to more closely resemble the NFL rule, but as it stands it doesn't.

Get over it. I made you look like an idiot and now you're floundering. You're actually obsessing over this. You spent time and energy in an erroneous endeavor to discredit and insult someone who beat you. Try again next year punk.



Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:22 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Here is another example of you comparing apples to tricycle-riding elephants. The NFL rule isn't the same as the college rule. Your entire pemise is based off that assumption and therefore is summarily dismissed as the blathering of an idiot.



Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:20 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Are you seriously saying that the play where an ineligible reciver caught a pass was a 'legal play'? Sorry idiot, but that play is wiped off the books. Too bad you don't understand anything about football.




Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:18 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Sorry, idiot, but I was out of town until recently. Care to try again with the baseless insinuations?



Since: Sep 15, 2008
Posted on: May 12, 2011 4:18 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Moron the rule is not the same as the NFL rule. They didn't 'import' the rul from the NFL



Since: Sep 7, 2009
Posted on: April 19, 2011 9:07 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

The rule is meant to prevent a foul from not only stopping the clock, but by penalizing a team that fouls with the intent of trying to get it stopped with more than just a yardage penalty. Why in the world would it be in effect when the clock is already stopped? No time will have been consumed as the clock will never start. <br /><br />Illegal formation fouls, celebration fouls, holding fouls - these aren't fouls that are committed to get the clock stopped. Offside (specifically the defense touching an offensive player), illegal passes, and false start fouls when time is running out will be the fouls teams will commit to get the clock stopped. <br /><br />Officials can reset the play clock to 40 seconds if the defense fouls to get the play clock to 25 after the foul is administered (in effect trying to buy themselves 15 seconds by fouling) when they are behind and trying to get the ball back. Now they can run 10 seconds off to boot. Again, the clock has to be running when the foul occurs, otherwise why what are they gaining by fouling?




Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: April 19, 2011 6:33 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Also, I have now figured out Scenario B. The result is that because the tight end was ineligible, you are now on the 20-yard line with nine seconds remaining, and the clock will start when the official signals. However, because the past snap was a legal play, there is no runoff. Game not over.



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: April 19, 2011 6:27 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Still waiting to see you go on, KD. Or are you ready to admit you didn't understand the rule?



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: April 18, 2011 5:40 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

I don't understand why people think that the game clock being stopped before a penalty makes the offending team immune to the penalty designed exactly for that situation.
Because in the NFL, where this rule comes from, the game clock being stopped before a penalty makes the offending team immune to the penalty of a 10-second runoff.



Since: Aug 21, 2006
Posted on: April 18, 2011 5:38 pm
 

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

It's that exact scenario which I think was the impetus for the new rule - Team A makes a first down inbounds late in a half, everyone rushes to the line and as the ball is put down by the U, the clock is started and then the QB spikes it as a few lineman are still running to the LOS to get set. In the past, the incomplete pass stopped the clock and the penalty for illegal formation was of little consequence since the offense accomplished their main goal of getting the clock stopped. Now, because all players weren't set between the time the ball was made ready for play and the snap, it's a false start to snap it and that will be a runoff (as long as they have no time outs left).

This is true. The rule is that the linemen would have to be set for at least one second, or the illegal formation becomes a false start and triggers the runoff. A false start with a running clock triggers the runoff. A false start with an already stopped clock is no runoff. An illegal formation or substitution, with or without the clock running, triggers no runoff.


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